Book Review: Alice in Tumblr-land And Other Fairy Tales for a New Generation

aliceThis book is absolutely hilarious and I think that anyone from my generation would absolutely love it as much as I did.  It is all your favorite Fairy Tale characters living in a modern day world and they all have social media.  Snow White wants to become a mother but vows not to post pictures of the baby on Facebook every day.  Belle and Beast are together but Belle keeps trying all these fad diets.  Peter Pan has a blog.  Puss in Boots has an Etsy shop.  Cinderella is trying her hand at photography.  The Ugly Duckling is having issues with her upcoming 10 year reunion and hating how she looks.  Chicken Little is worried about everything.  Pinocchio wonders if he puts his lies on Wikipedia if they’d be true… and much, much more goes on in this book.

It is a relatively quick read – you can probably knock it out in a couple of hours and if you’re anything like me there will be at least 5 pages that make you laugh out loud because they describe you to a T.  (Sleeping Beauty and I are meant to be BFFs, I think)

Seriously hilarious and a MUST READ!

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

How many selfies would the Ugly Duckling post on Instagram? Would Geppetto make Pinocchio pay his own rent like a “real boy”? Maybe Rapunzel freshened her look with a pixie cut? Did Prince Charming try browsing the Facebook Events page to find Cinderella after the Ball?

These questions and more are answered in Tim Manley’s forthcoming Penguin Hardcover, ALICE IN TUMBLR-LAND: And Other Fairy Tales For a New Generation (On Sale Date: October 29, 2013; ISBN: 978-0-14-312479-5; $18.00). Tim is well known for his popular blog “Fairy Tales for Twenty-Somethings”, which has been featured in the Seattle Times, Buzzfeed, Flavorpill, and the Huffington Post, and has expanded that idea to create the perfect read for a generation adept at social media and acutely nostalgic for the idealistic stories from their childhood. This colorful, enlightening resource contains more than a hundred new stories and cartoons of classic fairy tale characters finding themselves, tackling relationships, and pondering their contribution to the globalized corporate machine — one text message/night of binge drinking/creepy OkCupid profile at a time.

Category: Book Review
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