Book Review: In Concert With Death

This book tool me a very, very long time to get through. I enjoyed it, but I think that it could have been scaled back a little bit and still been just as good, just shorter and quicker to read.  There is a serial killer on the lose and he has killed at an Aerosmith concert in Boston.  The kill count starts ticking up almost immediately and before you know it there were 30, 40 deaths reported and no sign of the “unsub” (I felt like I was reading an episode of Criminal Minds)  It seemed that the killer has been triggered by losing a scholarship and the kills just keep getting bigger and bigger.  Police find out that he had killed his parents but did their jobs from home as them for a while to get their money and not have anyone notice that they had disappeared! Kind of genius, I have to admit.  He wants to be known as the Concert Killer and all of the victims are “in concert with death”.  I won’t go into too much more detail but like I said the kills get bigger and bigger. And are just unbelievable (or at least they were at the time I read this a few months ago, now with there being a mass shooting at a concert maybe I feel a bit different.)  The other thing about the book I didn’t really like was how short the chapters were. Like a page or two. It just seemed to chop the book up a lot and I could never get a flow going which may be why it took me so long to finish! If that is a detail you can ignore and you don’t mind longer books and enjoy a good concert murder mystery I think you will enjoy this one.

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the book

A young adult begins a series of murders that gets the attention of the FBI’s most senior investigators. The serial killer challenges the retiring Feds as they have never been before. They do all possible to stop the kill spree that mostly happens at music events. He’s creative, intelligent, daring, and adventurous as he kills in ways that take the FBI team to their limits again and again. No one knows when, where, or how he will kill. All anyone knows is that he will kill again. Chasing a genius is always difficult, but doing it through crowded rock concerts is an exceptional challenge.  Both killer and law enforcement have to be exceptionally creative to stay a part of this most deadly chase.

 

John is a former Marine from Massachusetts who has located to Charlotte, North Carolina. While he has done many things in his life, it is writing novels that excites him the most. What John writes is a blend of fact and fiction. His characters are based around people he has known at various points in time. The locations are also often very real. John finds it easier for his readers to get into a story when they find enough reality in it. They can sometimes walk to a given location or feel that they know a particular character. All are fast paced and highly detailed. John also keeps a sense of humor to keep his characters human. All are very personal to him, but he still dares to handle storylines that are outlandish at times.

Keywords: Murder Mystery, Serial Killer, Daring, Challenging, Fun, Quick-Paced, Detailed, Personal, Factual, Outlandish, Spirited, Creative

Book Review: A Beast’s Belle

I have to say that this is one of the worst books I have ever had the pleasure of reading. It is supposed to be an erotica romance novel based on Beauty and the Beast – which I have been all about lately since the live action movie has been released.  Most of the book was filler and I am pretty sure that the only actual sex in the book was actually rape.  It was a quick read but it is really not even worth your time.  The book is very very loosely based on Beauty and the Beast – the main girl is named Isabel and she is the servant at a castle where they are whipped if they don’t follow the rules and then when the prince has a party they all have to be naked servants for the party.  Just… trust me and don’t bother with this one.

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

A Beast’s Belle is a fairy tale retold – echoing the ground-breaking BDSM Beauty books by Anne Rice.

The novel offers a twist on a classic story; Isabel is the daughter of a widowed inventor and tinkerer, but leaves home to join the indentured staff of a manor. Upon arriving, she explores the rigid structure of domestic servitude and discipline in the manor, and eventually grows fascinated with the Master of the house, a feral man with curious proclivities and voracious appetites. Isabel tries to find her way in a new life at the manor, but quickly finds herself bound up with the Master of the house and engrossed in the lifestyle and ritual the manor’s occupants share.

Book Review: More Girls Who Rocked The World

More Girls Who Rocked The World is a mixture of some badass females who are out there from Queens to pirates to computer scientists to politicians, singers, activists and more.  There are 45 girls in the book of women who fought to follow their dreams and succeeded.  Each “girl” has several pages about her as her bio. This is a quick and easy read, but incredibly inspirational – if these ladies did it – why can’t I?  Some of the girls in here I knew about and some I didn’t, but that didn’t make each and every one of them any less inspirational.  I was especially happy to see Bindi Irwin included!

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

From the inspiring author of Girls Who Rocked the World comes another comprehensive collection of true, inspiring profiles of successful young women throughout history who made their mark on the world before turning twenty.

Young women today crave strong, independent role models to look to for motivation. In the follow-up to the bestseller Girls Who Rocked the World, More Girls Who Rocked the World offers a fun and uplifting collection of influential stories with forty-five more movers and shakers who made a difference before turning twenty.

From Annie Oakley and Queen Victoria to Malala Yousafzai and Adele—each with her own incredible story of how she created life-changing opportunities for herself and the world—you’ll get to know these capable queens of empires and courageous icons of entertainment. Also included are profiles of gutsy teenagers who are out there rocking the world right now and personal aspirations from today’s young women.

Book Review: Sting Like a Bee

Sting Like a Bee is Muhammad Ali vs The USA.  Ali retired at 39 years old and was sick for 35 years.  From 1966-1971 he was discussed by pretty much everyone on the planet.  Once the miltary draft came around, Ali’s refusal to serve led to a legal battle.  Since Ali was now Muslim, that means that there was no war unless it was declared by Allah.  Ali was a conscientious objector and there was FBI involvement after his refusal.  The majority of the book talks about this aspect of Ali’s life, but there is some other stories about his life as well – like how he knocked out 2 of his mom’s teeth at 6 months old! There are also a lot of excerpts throughout from interviews and other legal documents.  I thought this was an interesting read because it was a different story that what you usually hear about Muhammad Ali and one that I did not know much about.

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

An insightful portrait of Muhammed Ali from the New York Times bestselling author of At the Altar of Speed and The Big Bam. It centers on the cultural and political implications of Ali’s refusal of service in the military—and the key moments in a life that was as high profile and transformative as any in the twentieth century.

With the death of Muhammad Ali in June, 2016, the media and America in general have remembered a hero, a heavyweight champion, an Olympic gold medalist, an icon, and a man who represents the sheer greatness of America. New York Times bestselling author Leigh Montville goes deeper, with a fascinating chronicle of a story that has been largely untold. Muhammad Ali, in the late 1960s, was young, successful, brash, and hugely admired—but with some reservations. He was bombastic and cocky in a way that captured the imagination of America, but also drew its detractors. He was a bold young African American in an era when few people were as outspoken. He renounced his name—Cassius Clay—as being his ‘slave name,’ and joined the Nation of Islam, renaming himself Muhammad Ali. And finally in 1966, after being drafted, he refused to join the military for religious and conscientious reasons, triggering a fight that was larger than any of his bouts in the ring. What followed was a period of legal battles, of cultural obsession, and in some ways of being the very embodiment of the civil rights movement located in the heart of one man. Muhammad Ali was the tip of the arrow, and Leigh Montville brilliantly assembles all the boxing, the charisma, the cultural and political shifting tides, and ultimately the enormous waft of entertainment that always surrounded Ali. Muhammed Ali vs. the United States of America is an important and incredibly engaging book.

Book Review: My Rad Life

This book is the companion to Rad America Women and while they usually write books about rad women this book is all about YOU! It is a journal and you can write in it front to back or pick random pages to complete as the mood strikes.  If someone is RAD they are strong, independent and bold.  There are various prompts throughout the journal – making a list of your favorite books, drawing covers for them, what you dreams are and how you want to make them come true, among many others. There are also quotes throughout the book from other rad women.

While I wouldn’t quite say I “Read” this book, it did give me a lot of great ideas through the prompts and get me thinking about myself in ways that I otherwise might not have. I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

Book Review: Women In Sports

Women In Sports features 50 fearless athletes. The book talks about them chronologically, starting in 1893. I only recognized about 15 names, the more modern names like Biles and Ledecky.  Women are often touted as the “Weaker sex” but these athletes show just what woman can do and they have become legends!  There are really cool illustrations throughout the book and there are pages for each of the women which includes a small bio on that athlete.  Pretty much every sport there is, is represented throughout this book and it was a really fun and interesting read!

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

Book Review: Dinner with DiMaggio

Dinner with DiMaggio includes candid stories from those who knew him.  The book revolves around his relationship with Dr. Rock Positano, a NYC foot specialist.  The book goes into some of Joe’s rituals and quirks.  I was surprised to find out that he grew up in New Haven!  He was a very private person and had a life in New York, California and Florida and those lives never intersected. Everyone from each piece of his life only had some pieces of the puzzle, but Rock seemed to know about all of the aspects of his life.  There are stories in the book about his relationship with Marilyn Monroe and other great stories from Rock who ended up becoming like an additional son to DiMaggio and spent a lot of time with him and has a lot of really great stories to tell. If you are a baseball fan you won’t want to miss the change to read this book.

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

The real Joe DiMaggio, remembered by the man who knew him best in the last decade of his life—candid and little-known stories about icons from Ted Williams, Lou Gehrig, and his Yankees teammates on the field to Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, and other great celebrities off the field.

Dr. Rock Positano, an internationally renowned foot specialist in New York City, was introduced to Joe DiMaggio by the dean of New York sports writers, Bill Gallo, in 1990. The Yankee Clipper’s career-ending heel spur injury and botched surgeries brought them together. During the time Dr. Positano successfully treated the Yankee Clipper, a friendship slowly developed. As Dr. Positano would learn, DiMaggio moved very carefully and deliberately.

Dinner with DiMaggio follows the story of their friendship from its star-struck beginning through all its highs and lows over the next decade. Forty years younger than DiMaggio, Dr. Positano became a surrogate son at a time when his actual son was suffering from substance-abuse problems. Positano’s accounts of their times together reveal DiMaggio’s many rituals and quirks: the same meals at the same restaurants, the same pals in New York and Florida, jacket and tie everywhere. At the pinnacle of his fame, DiMaggio had learned to be guarded and carefully managed his image and private life. As his trust in his young friend grew, DiMaggio opened up about Marilyn, but also about his first wife, Dorothy Arnold, the mother of his son and the real love of his life. The Yankee Clipper knew everyone, and Positano shares never-before-told stories of famous people DiMaggio admired and those he didn’t.

This is DiMaggio as he really was: sometimes cranky and calculating, but more often charming, generous, loyal, and always big-hearted when it came to kids. The stories and experiences he shared with Rock Positano comprise an intimate portrait of one of the great stars of baseball and one of the icons of the twentieth century.

Book Review: Geek Girl Rising

Geek Girl Rising is all about females working in tech.  It features Debbie Sterling who started GoldieBlox which is a product that I haven’t tried but absolutely LOVE the idea of – an engineering toy for girls – that I absolutely wish was around for me when I was younger!  Also featured is Ipsy, the lead software developer of Pinterest, and a bunch of other kick ass women in tech.  It talks a bit about sexism and overcoming to work in the field (this is a HUGE thing that unfortunately most women in this field have to put up with and overcome) and I love what they are doing! There definitely is room for females in the tech industry and a lot of really smart ones out there who are moving up the ranks as well as creating their own companies.  There are a lot of great role models out there and this book focuses on a few of them.

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

Book Review: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (The Wizard of Oz Collection)

I had always wanted to read the Wizard of Oz books, but never had gotten around to it. I have seen the movie so, so many times and as I kid I had read some of the other L Frank Baum books that I found at the library, but never the story that the movie was based on! Since this is a kids book, it was a pretty quick read for me – that and the movie is pretty fresh in my mind so I was able to easily picture most of what was happening in the story since it was so similar.  The book is a bit more detailed than the movie, which makes sense, and of course the real difference is that the shoes are SILVER! Not Ruby Red!

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review, I was not otherwise compensated.

About the book

Blown far from her home to the magical Land of Oz, little Dorothy must follow the yellow-brick road to the Emerald City and ask the Great and Terrible Wizard of Oz for help. With the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion by her side, Dorothy must first defeat the Wicked Witch of the West – but will the Wizard’s magic be enough to help her get home?

Book Review: Called Out

 

About the Book

Jen Doyle is back with another hot and heartfelt home run of a contemporary romance. Fans of Jill Shalvis should prepare to swoon over Jack and Lola’s HEA. 

Jack “Ox” Oxford is used to being alone. Granted, when you screw over your friends, being alone isn’t always a choice. Playing for the Chicago Watchmen is a last-ditch effort to save his career…and right some of his past wrongs. He’s not expecting a warm reception, but he’s also not expecting a flat tire to change everything.

Recovering control freak, single mom and semiprofessional chaos wrangler Lola Deacon McIntire doesn’t need an arrogant ballplayer to swoop in and save her from anything, much less her flat tire. And she definitely doesn’t need her body to betray her and decide this is the guy to wake up her rusty libido. She isn’t about to upset her sons’ lives for any man—much less one who so clearly doesn’t think he’s dad material.

Jack never thought he’d find someone who wanted to build a life with him, but the more time he spends with Lola and her boys, the more it starts to feel permanent. Even tough-as-nails Lola concedes there just might be a future here—the big, beautiful, messy future neither of them was looking for—but only if Jack will accept he deserves it.

 

This book is approximately 100,000 words