Book Review: Crochet Stories Grimms’ Fairy Tales

grimmAnother Crochet book in which I wish I knew how to crochet.  This one features some of your favorite characters from Grimms’ Fairy Tales.   As with most craft books, this one starts out with some notes, tips and abbreviations so you understand what is going on in the rest of the book.   The first pattern is an easy pattern known as the “Basic Person” which will get you started on any of the person characters in the book.  Each project has a list of all the things you need and is broken down by The Yarn, The Hook, Additional Materials, Measurements and Gauge.  There is the skill level, a photo of the finished product and a break down of the steps to create it.  The rest of the book is broken down by each of the Grimms’ Fairy Tales beginning with a photo of a scene that you can create and then the story. Included are Hansel and Gretel, THe Hare and the Hedgehog, Jack and the beanstalk (The giant looks a bit like Hagrid if you decide to try and make some Harry Potter characters too!), Tom Thumb and Rapunzel.

I think my personal favorites are the house from Hansel and Gretel, Rapunzel and her tower and the hedgehogs! Now, if only I could learn how to crochet.  Maybe that’s something for the 2017 crafty to-do list.  2016 has enough on there as it is 😉

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review. I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

Practitioners of amigurumi, the Japanese art of crocheting stuffed dolls, will adore this collection of sixteen playful patterns for fairy tale figures. Projects include the witch and the gingerbread house as well as the hero and heroine of “Hansel and Gretel”; the giant and the golden goose’s eggs of “Jack and the Beanstalk,” in addition to the beanstalk and Jack himself; the long-haired captive of “Rapunzel,” her lonely tower, and her rescuer, the prince; the animals of “The Hare and the Hedgehog” plus a juicy carrot; and the wee subject of “Tom Thumb” and his cow.
Clear instructions for creating the characters are accompanied by color photos of the finished products along with charming retellings of all five fairy tales. An introductory chapter offers general notes and tips, including pointers on working in the round, stuffing, measurements, and finishing.

Category: Book Review
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