Book Review: Do Your Laundry Or You’ll Die Alone

laundryUnfortunately this book was not really properly formatted for either my Nook or my computer. Somehow a lot of text ended up on top of itself which made reading it a bit difficult. The book is full of advice your mom would give you if she thought you were listening and clocks in at just under 200 pages.  Although it is a bit on the longer side, it is (or should have been) a rather quick and easy read with short little pieces of advice on each page.  Some of it is common sense and others are not.  I had no idea if I didn’t do my laundry I would die alone…  Maybe I should stop reading and get on that?

Oh but wait – #37 is “Reading is sexy” I guess the laundry can wait until after I am finished here.

While I did enjoy this book and it did have a lot of great advice in it, I truly wish I could have enjoyed it as it was intended and not with words getting cut off and being on top of one another.  If you buy the book and it looks proper – please let me sneak a peak?

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review. I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

When Becky Blades sent her firstborn daughter off to Harvard, she knew the world’s top-ranked college would not be covering the most important material: how to be kind, happy, and appropriate in public; how to protect oneself from sock monsters, boring conversations, and scary dates; and why you should keep your clothes clean. So the day before classes started, Blades emailed a good-bye letter with motherly advice she had kept to herself for a year. Just in time for her youngest daughter’s graduation from high school, Blades illustrated the prose with her signature mixed-media artwork, creating a thought-provoking, conversation-starting book.

 

With warmth, wit, and a hint of motherly sass, Do Your Laundry, or You’ll Die Alone: Advice Your Mom Would Give If She Thought You Were Listening blends bite-sized morsels of coming-of-age common sense such as, “Keep at least one stuffed animal,” and, “A bad attitude makes your butt look big,” with tiny essays on topics like forgiveness and phone etiquette.

Category: Book Review
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