Book Review: The Big Hairy Secret

Well, I probably should have thought a little bit more about what “The Big Hairy Secret” was before agreeing to read this book.  I started it and it seemed innocent enough – Flo  and her mom move to a new apartment building where she meets Furry.  She thinks he is weird but figures she’d see what he is all about.  While hanging out in the basement while Furry does his laundry, Flo discovers The Big Hairy Secret in the apartment building.

Yes, Spiders.  So, on that note, I stopped reading the book about halfway through.   I can not deal with spiders and even illustrations in a childrens book are going to give me nightmares.  I can’t believe I had to stop reading a book geared for 7-8 year olds, but what can I say? I’m a wuss.

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review. I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

Flo Gardner isn’t exactly thrilled when she and her mom move into Corman Towers, a giant apartment building in the middle of the city. To call their new home strange is an understatement. And things only get weirder when she meets Ferdinand, better known as Furry. It doesn’t take Flo long to realize that there’s more than one secret lurking in her new home.

For ages 7-8. From the Furry and Flo series.

*Funny, quirky chapter book series featuring two main characters kids can relate to
*Humorous, quirky black-and-white artwork throughout (both full-page and spot illustrations)
*Supernatural aspect with werewolves and other monsters presented in a funny, appealing way (not scary!)
*Combination action, adventure, & mystery stories – kids can follow along and try to solve mysteries and problems with Furry & Flo

About the Author:
Thomas Kingsley Troupe has written more than 30 children’s books. His book Legend of the Werewolf (Picture Window Books, 2011) received a bronze medal for the Moonbeam Children’s Book Award. Thomas lives in Woodbury, Minnesota, with his wife and two young boys.

About the Illustrator:
Stephen Gilpin has been working as an illustrator and cartoonist since 2000 and has around 20 kids’ picture books and chapter books under his belt. His clients include Harper Collins, Random House, Simon and Schuster, Scholastic, and the Wall Street Journal among many others.

Category: Book Review
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