Book Review: The Honest Toddler

 I don’t have kids, nor do I want any kids but there is something about The Honest Toddler that keeps me captivated.  Maybe it’s because The Honest Toddler tells it like it is.  This book is written for parents from the kids point of view – and makes one thing clear – it is not the parents that are in charge, it’s the toddlers.  The book was funny, though I thought it would be more like the Honest Toddler I’ve seen on twitter and less like a book.

Each chapter starts with a letter of advice to the toddler, which I found to be the best part.  Definitely humorous although if you’re a parent you probably won’t have the time to actually sit down and read the book.  One tip? If you’re a parent AND A blogger – delete the blog and see all the free time you’ll have! (Obviously to spend with the toddler instead of blogging about all the quality time you spend with your toddler)

If you’re looking for some humor and maybe some parenting advice in there too – check out this book.

I received a free e-copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in order to write this review. I was not otherwise compensated.

 

About the Book

An irreverent, laugh-out-loud funny parenting guide from The Honest Toddler, the Internet’s most infamous tot, whose unchecked sense of entitlement and undeniable charm have captivated hundreds of thousands of fans online.

In this antidote to heavy-handed advice books written by parenting “experts” who have gotten too big for size 2T britches,The Honest Toddler provides an indispensable manual to parenting that places the toddler’s happiness front and center. Outrageously confident and sweetly indignant, The Honest Toddler tackles everything from preferred toddler foods (unbroken crackers and undiluted juice), unconditional love (accept them as they are—pants or no pants), sleep and potty training methods (none), play date etiquette (mi casa es not su casa) and the proper response to random aggression at the playground (embrace it. Park justice is messy but swift).

 

The result is a parenting book like no other, one that will leave moms and dads laughing, and maybe crying, as they recognize their own child in the ongoing shenanigans of one bravely honest toddler.

Category: Book Review
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