Book Review: Fantastic Failures

Fantastic Failures is all about people who have changed the world – but not without falling down first.  Some of the names that you will probably recognize that are included in this book include – Harry Potter author JK Rowling, Media superstar Oprah, movie director Steven Speilberg, NASA brain Katherine Johnson… The moral of the story is, be persistent and keep trying.  Fall down 7 times, stand up 8.  If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.  Just think of all the things we would not have if the people in this book gave up after their first attempt didn’t go as they had planned for it to!

 

I received a free e-copy of this book in order to write this review. I was not otherwise compensated.

About the Book

Even the most well-known people have struggled to succeed! Find out what they learned and how they turned their failures into triumphs with this engaging and youthful guide on how to succeed long term.

There is a lot of pressure in today’s society to succeed, but failing is a part of learning how to be a successful person. In his teaching career, Luke Reynolds saw the stress and anxiety his students suffered over grades, fitting in, and getting things right the first time. Fantastic Failures helps students learn that their mistakes and failures do not define their whole lives, but help them grow into their potential.

Kids will love learning about some of the well-known people who failed before succeeding and will come to understand that failure is a large component of success. With stories from people like J. K. Rowling, Albert Einstein, Rosa Parks, Sonia Sotomayor, Vincent Van Gogh, Julia Child, Steven Spielberg, and Betsy Johnson, each profile proves that the greatest mistakes and flops can turn into something amazing. Intermixed throughout the fun profiles, Reynolds spotlights great inventors and scientists who discovered and created some of the most important medicines, devices, and concepts of all time, including lifesaving vaccines and medicines that were stumbled upon by mistake.

 

Category: Book Review
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